Difference between revisions of "Philosophy Department"

From Special Collections Research Center Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
(New page: Department of Philosophy "The department, through a varied and extensive program of courses, presents students with past and present attempts to think critically and reflectively about fu...)
 
m
Line 1: Line 1:
Department of Philosophy
+
The '''Department of Philosophy''', "through a varied and extensive program of courses, presents students with past and present attempts to think critically and reflectively about fundamental questions of knowledge and value in order that they will be led to examine their own views. The study of philosophical problems in the spirit of free inquiry requires the student to develop and exercise the powers of precise discrimination, creative imagination, logical organization and evaluative judgment."[http://web.wm.edu/philosophy/]
 
 
"The department, through a varied and extensive program of courses, presents students with past and present attempts to think critically and reflectively about fundamental questions of knowledge and value in order that they will be led to examine their own views. The study of philosophical problems in the spirit of free inquiry requires the student to develop and exercise the powers of precise discrimination, creative imagination, logical organization and evaluative judgment."
 
  
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
*Philosophy Department webpage, http://web.wm.edu/philosophy/, accessed 25 February 2009.
+
*Philosophy Department webpage, [http://web.wm.edu/philosophy/ http://web.wm.edu/philosophy/], accessed 25 February 2009.
  
 
[[Category: College of William and Mary Academic Department|Philosophy]]
 
[[Category: College of William and Mary Academic Department|Philosophy]]

Revision as of 18:47, 28 February 2009

The Department of Philosophy, "through a varied and extensive program of courses, presents students with past and present attempts to think critically and reflectively about fundamental questions of knowledge and value in order that they will be led to examine their own views. The study of philosophical problems in the spirit of free inquiry requires the student to develop and exercise the powers of precise discrimination, creative imagination, logical organization and evaluative judgment."[1]


References